Who Needs a Gallbladder Anyway?

Living overseas means always looking for cultural experiences.  And spending the night in the hospital is one of those that you don’t look forward to checking off the list but it definitely counts as a cultural experience.  Up until tomorrow (when I will be having my gallbladder out and be spending the night at Hollywood Hospital here in Perth), I’ve only ever spent the night in one other hospital as an adult.  And it was indeed a cultural experience because I was in Ghana.Screen Shot 2017-06-14 at 12.52.10 PMI was hospitalized for malaria and can’t remember now if it was one night or two or three but I recovered well enough and went on to hike, find rainbows, chase waterfalls and generally enjoy myself for the rest of my semester abroad (although this picture I think was taken in Togo).  I don’t have too many memories of the hospital other than they left the lights on all night, everyone else in my shared room had family coming in to visit and take care of them, the hospital provided beans and cooked plantains for my meals and when I left, I paid for the whole bill with just what cash I had in my wallet (which wasn’t much).Screen Shot 2017-06-14 at 12.54.26 PMAnd now we’re in Australia, we’re still finding rainbows and tomorrow I will be comparing my hospital experience to the one I had a little over 10 years ago in Ghana.  I’ll let you know about the lights and the shared room.  But I’m pretty certain I won’t be fed beans and plantains.  And I’m 100% sure that I won’t be able to pay for the bill with the cash I have on hand.  I’m thankful for credit cards and insurance.

Even though this is a pretty routine surgery, I still appreciate your prayers.  Please pray for no complications and a quick and easy recovery.

Does it Matter Which Word We Use?

On Christmas we see many depictions of the nativity scene and most of them are beautiful, clean and etherial.  I love these scenes that give me a visual of the Biblical stories of Mary and Jospeh traveling to Bethlehem and Mary giving birth to the Light of the World.  However, I realize that they are a cleaned up, sanitized version of what really happened.  The following story from Bob Creson, Wycliffe USA’s President and his communication assistant, Carol Schatz, gave Ryan and me a new perspective on this story that we know very well.  I hope you enjoy it and see the beautiful humility of Christ this Christmas season.screen-shot-2016-12-21-at-12-18-30-pmAs the Mbe translation team in Nigeria was translating the Gospel of Luke, they came to chapter 2, verse 7: “She [Mary] gave birth to her first child, a son. She wrapped him snugly in strips of cloth and laid him in a manger, because there was no lodging available for them.”

The translators took time to ponder how to translate some of the words, but not “manger.” They immediately used the word “ókpáng.”

The “What’s an ókpáng?” asked their consultant, John Watters. “Tell me what it looks like.” One of the translators drew a picture on the whiteboard. It was essentially a cradle hung by ropes so that the newborn would be laid in it and swung.

“Read the Translator’s Notes again,” John suggested. “What do the notes say about the manger?” (“Translators Notes” is a series of commentaries in non-technical English that are especially helpful for Bible translators for whom English is a second language.)

The Mbe translators read the notes and saw that “manger” referred to an animal feeding trough. Even as the Mbe team read the notes, they objected. “We have always used the word ókpáng. We have used it for years, and that’s what we should use.”

John pointed out to them that it wasn’t just a matter of tradition. God expects us to find the words that express the original meaning as accurately as possible. Furthermore, this word tells us something profound about God. “When he came to live among us and bring salvation to us, he came in the lowliest way possible. He did not come and sleep in a nice ókpáng like every Mbe mother wants for her newborn. Instead, he showed us his unbelievable humility,” John told them. “So we need to find your best word for an animal feeding trough.”

Suddenly the one who had argued most loudly for the traditional term offered, “We feed our animals out of an old worn-out basket that is not usable anymore except to fee the animals. We call it ‘ɛdzábrí.’”

“Then try that term,” said John. “Put it in your rough draft and test it with Mbe speakers.”

“As the Mbe people listened, they were visibly moved. Picturing the newborn baby lying in the animals’ feeding basket, they recognized in a new way that Jesus was willing to do whatever it took to reach them. As an adult, he would humble himself by washing the disciples’ feet and then by dying on the cross. And this humility started right from birth, when he was born to a young peasant woman under questionable social conditions and laid in an animal feeding trough.

“No word in Scripture is too unimportant to translate carefully and accurately. And no language community is too unimportant to merit the Scriptures in the language they best understand. John Watters says, “Translation in the heart language respects the people who speak it, and through the process it frees them to have a relationship with God in their own words and terms.”